Goodale Park Column

I used to live across the street from this column over twenty years ago and have wanted to redo it ever since.
I used to live across the street from this column over twenty years ago and have wanted to redo it ever since.

This column in Goodale Park in Columbus, Ohio, originally installed in 1899, has deteriorated badly. I have been commissioned by a Centennial Preservation Group to re-carve the heads. My proposal is to rebuild the missing parts with clay and then to re-carve new sandstone blocks to match the clay.

The heads on the nearby gate have fared much better, as they are under a roof.
The heads on the nearby gate have fared much better, as they are under a roof.

The gate and column were a gift in 1899 to the City’s first park. The original meanings of the column animals have been lost to time, although we do know that the eight human heads on the gate represent the eight stages of Man. The carving is masterful, and does not resemble any other carving in the Columbus area, that I know of. We know nothing of the original artist.

The animal heads as they have appeared for decades.
The animal heads as they have appeared for decades.

The tooling on the buff sandstone has survived remarkably well, and demonstrates the level of the craftsmanship brought to this column. The heads are about 9′ off the ground- too high to touch. The wear is likely from acid rain and the burning of coal for so many decades.

The lift operator was not bad, but not overly confident. I think he may have needed a change of underwear after this.
The lift operator was not bad, but not overly confident. I think he may have needed a change of underwear after this.

The cap came off easily, and we set it aside. After we had picked the section with the heads and put it on my truck, we put the cap back for safekeeping while the restoration is done in my studio.

Note the pattern on the cap- impeccable craftsmanship.
Note the pattern on the cap- impeccable craftsmanship.

Playing with big lifts and heavy things is always exciting. Although no one can really see it, the scalloped top is textured with one continuous spiral line from top to bottom.

You don't know what you've got til it's gone...
You don’t know what you’ve got til it’s gone…

This is the only original photo the historical committee could give me. Detail must be inferred. It is agreed the animal on the left is probably a panther, and that the one on the right is a lion. The ram, not show here, is extent enough to know it is a ram, but the fourth head was badly deteriorated and no known photo exists.

Kind of scary, kind of silly.
Kind of scary, kind of silly.

The ears, the eyes, a bit of the for head, and a grainy photo are all there is to go on, but that’s enough to conclude it was a stylized panther.

Some thought this one may have been a camel.
Some thought this one may have been a camel.

Part of an eye, droopy ears, and a bit of forehead seem to indicate the subject was a dog. No known photographs exist.

This one is very different from the rest- symmetrical, not terribly rotted, and not very expressive in the eyes.
This one is very different from the rest- symmetrical, not terribly rotted, and not very expressive in the eyes.

The ram is pretty much intact, and a hint at the style that may have been used for the other heads, although it does seem very different.

I don't think anybody passing by would have seen this as an animal head.
I don’t think anybody passing by would have seen this as an animal head.

The lion head featured a bit of an ear, some mane, and pits indicating the height of the eyes. The source photo and the extent remains indicate this was a lion. Here I have started on the lion, and on the left is an early version of the panther.

Old toothless, we used to call him.
Old toothless, we used to call him.

Using an oil-based clay that gets softer with heat (I use an old Sunbeam electric skillet), I rebuilt the heads in full scale in my shop. This is an early stage of the panther. The lion is on the right, the dog on the left. The sandstone blocks are 16 1/2″ tall.

I could not think of another animal with front-facing eyes and floppy ears. Can you?
I could not think of another animal with front-facing eyes and floppy ears. Can you?

I was able to get a good start by making the right begin to mirror the left. At this stage I had to commit to something, and felt that the only defensible choice was a dog.

The eyes don't focus on a single point- they look in two different directions, intentionally.
The eyes don’t focus on a single point- they look in two different directions, intentionally.

The red sandstone is the original carver’s work. I have tried throughout to do what I could to work in his style more than my own. I’ve learned during this process several pointers from the past.

The lion was the hardest. Not having the eyes made getting the expression a challenge.
The lion was the hardest. Not having the eyes made getting the expression a challenge.

The lion, nearly complete. I will add textural details in the sandstone when I recarve them.

Rather concerned for a dog, but I guess dog's can be concerned about life , too.
Rather concerned for a dog, but I guess dog’s can be concerned about life , too.

The dog is as animated as I could get him, given the restraints.

I patterned his sneer from Elvis's.
I patterned his sneer from Elvis’s.

I gave the panther a sneer, as the eyes sort of implied that, as did the source photo. He struck me as a tease, a mischief maker.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comfest Sculpture

This was the first pice, and consisted of 49pieces I had installed the day before the opening; when I got there the next day, there were 48 pieces. Really?
This was the first piece, and consisted of 49 pieces I had installed the day before the opening; when I got there the next day, there were 48 pieces. Really?

Comfest is a big deal in Columbus, Ohio. Each summer volunteers put on three days of music, activist opportunities, and fun. Last year the organizers decided to add sculpture and asked me to participate. I had these pieces left over from roughing out an earlier piece, and drilled them and glued in steel pins on one end. They were easy to plunge into the soft ground to build ever changing sculptures, some made by me alone, others with the help of the festival goers.

This is a different view of the first sculpture.
This is a different view of the first sculpture.

For three days I made a constantly evolving piece, with the help of the community. It was a lot of fun, and there were some interesting conversations and interactions. Doing Art in public is a riot.

Circling the square?
Circling the square?

The square gave way to the circle., one piece at a time. Each post weighs about thirty pounds. At the end of each day I was definitely feeling it.

Oh my, the pins hold them even if they are not plumb. Discovery!
Oh my, the pins hold them even if they are not plumb. Discovery!

This piece was done by gently tossing the posts through the air and letting them land as they may. I wish I had taken a video of this one. Several of us plucking the posts from the circle and tossing them around. Good times. Would have made great video.

Chaos gives way to grace.
Chaos gives way to grace.

This version is so relaxed it almost looks drunken.

Occuping a lot of space sculpturally with only a little material is the goal.
Occuping a lot of space sculpturally with only a little material is the goal.

After I had completed this one, a man approached and performed an amazing feat- he leaped them al, on after the other, without stopping and without blowing a single landing.

The construction by a human indicating that a human was here. Strange urge.
The construction by a human indicating that a human was here. Strange urge.

Another view.

I took a break and came back to find that volunteers had converted the last piece to this one.
I took a break and came back to find that volunteers had converted the last piece to this one.

It was hilarious to watch the would-be ninjas try to balance on these structures, clearly a bit buzzed… not.

Ashley did his best not to indicate signs of fear.
Ashley did his best not to indicate signs of fear.

My friend Ashley came by (wonderful painter) and asked if I would do him as a chalk outline. He got way more than he asked for. No bumping the sculpture allowed!

Houdini!
Houdini!

And then he managed to crawl out without disturbing a single stone. Go Ashley!

(Ashely's view)
(Ashely’s view)

Now ask yourself- how did he get out of there? Not for the faint of heart. He was VERY slow about it, I must say.

I had the able help of painter Jonathon Ryan on this one, and a couple others. Thanks Jonathon, that was fun!
I had the able help of painter Jonathon Ryan on this one, and a couple others. Thanks Jonathon, that was fun!

That is all balance, and in a very public and crowded space. Majestic, it was. And all by eye. No measuring tools were used throughout the festival.

Another view.
Another view.

This one occupied the most space and took the longest time to make. Very tricky- and very cool.

Fred Astaire!
Fred Astaire!

This subtle piece was done by a volunteer. I dig it.

This was Ashley's idea, and several of us made it. Thanks Comfest!
This was Ashley’s idea, and several of us made it. Thanks Comfest!

Peace, Art, and good times on a summer day. Wonderful.

Sentinels as the crowd thins and the festival closes.
Sentinels as the crowd thins and the festival closes.

Ihad a great time. Thanks Comfest. What for next year, eh?

Butler University Memorial Columbarium

Butler Memorial Bulldog

This is a photo of Blue, Butler University’s mascot. Butler has been a champion basketball team for generations, and I have had the honor of doing several projects for the university. The latest was a columbarium to hold the ashes of all past and future mascots. I was commissioned to do a sculpture for the memorial.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

A block of styrofoam has been begun. Myself and my fellow sculptor and friend Anthony Jacobs used a large hot wire to cut through the foam. Nobody else was there to take our picture.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

Carving the styrofoam armature is very tricky, because the eye’s tendency is to imagine the form of the finished piece, which would leave no room for experimentation and improvisation.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

The clay I like is an oil-based clay that is hard at room temperature, but softens with heat. I use an old electric wok to heat the clay. Hot it can be poured; cold it can be carved like stone. It is useable for different purposes throughout the temperature range.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

Bronze is very revealing of texture. The difference between the two textures, once cast, will be very clear.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

Trip, Butler’s current mascot, came to inspect the finished clay master. Henry gave Trip a good sniffing. Note that Trip even has his own car!

Butler Memorial Bulldog

Michael, Trip’s owner and handler, came to inspect the finished clay master. We made a few adjustments, and then Trip gave his approval.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

The finished master on the way to the foundry.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

At the foundry a rubber mold is taken of the clay master. The mold is made of several different sections so that it can be removed without damage to itself or to the master. Once complete, the mold will beken off the master and painted on the inside with  hot wax until a wax reproduction of the clay master is created. The wax reproduction is about 1/4″ thick.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

The finished mold. The rubber has been covered with plaster so it will hold its shape. Each of the plaster sections has been keyed so that they lock together.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

After the wax reproduction is finished it is cut into smaller pieces, each of which is dipped repeatedly into a fluid form of ceramic slurry, each coat of which is also coated with a fine sand for stability. The ceramic is liquid, so it conforms to the shape of the wax perfectly. Once enough of a shell has been formed, the mold is fired in a special kiln, which melts the wax out at the same time that it fires the ceramic shell. The completed hollow mold will have molten bronze poured in, which will perfectly reproduce the shape of the wax reproduction of the clay master.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

The bronze head, after the ceramic mold has been broken off and the bronze sandblasted clean. The sections will next be welded back together, the welds cleaned and the texture chased to match the original, and then a patina will be applied.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

The welding process.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

John Cline, Foundry master, demonstrating how difficult the process is.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

The completed bronze is then heated with a torch and chemicals are sprayed onto the hot metal to change the color of the surface of the metal. After this, the sculpture is sealed and waxed.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

Headed to Indianapolis for the installation on campus.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

The finished sculpture, installed on campus, with the completed columbarium.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

Dedication. Beautiful day.

Butler Memorial Bulldog

The finished sculpture will be guarding the remains of the Butler mascots for generations to come. Thanks Butler Class of 2014!!!

 

All Life

All Life Indiana Limestone 8' x 3' x 3' (not including base) Stainless Steel Bearing
All Life
Indiana Limestone
8′ x 3′ x 3′ (not including base)
Stainless Steel Bearing

Created for an Integrative wellness center, this piece is designed to be interactive. Viewers can rotate the entire piece on a ball bearing placed under the base.

All Life Indiana Limestone 8' x 3' x 3' (not including base) Stainless Steel Bearing
All Life
Indiana Limestone
8′ x 3′ x 3′ (not including base)
Stainless Steel Bearing

This detail demonstrates the texture, revealing how the forms are “drawn” in space.

All Life Indiana Limestone 8' x 3' x 3' (not including base) Stainless Steel Bearing
All Life
Indiana Limestone
8′ x 3′ x 3′ (not including base)
Stainless Steel Bearing

Piercing all the way through a block of this size is very difficult, but the dramatic result is worth the effort.

All Life Indiana Limestone 8' x 3' x 3' (not including base) Stainless Steel Bearing
All Life
Indiana Limestone
8′ x 3′ x 3′ (not including base)
Stainless Steel Bearing

The original block weighed 10,500 pounds. Finished, it is around 5,000. It is an interesting feeling to rotate that much weight.

All Life Indiana Limestone 8' x 3' x 3' (not including base) Stainless Steel Bearing
All Life
Indiana Limestone
8′ x 3′ x 3′ (not including base)
Stainless Steel Bearing

The piece is always sightly different in the landscape, as seen from the main building.

All Life Indiana Limestone 8' x 3' x 3' (not including base) Stainless Steel Bearing
All Life
Indiana Limestone
8′ x 3′ x 3′ (not including base)
Stainless Steel Bearing

The depth of field of the piece is well shown in this detail.

All Life Indiana Limestone 8' x 3' x 3' (not including base) Stainless Steel Bearing
All Life
Indiana Limestone
8′ x 3′ x 3′ (not including base)
Stainless Steel Bearing

This piece was created over the winter of 2013-2014, and installed in the spring of 2014. It was a joy, despite the intense winter, to create this piece.

Mythical Creatures

Indiana Limestone 7'-6" x 4'-6" x 12" (not including base) Lewis Center, Ohio Delaware County Library System Children's Garden
Indiana Limestone
7′-6″ x 4′-6″ x 12″ (not including base)
Lewis Center, Ohio
Delaware County Library System Children’s Garden

A local resident left part of her estate to establish a children’s reading garden in the rapidly developing Delaware County Library System. I am honored to have been the first selected. I hope my work inspires young readers for generations to come.

Indiana Limestone 7'-6" x 4'-6" x 12" Lewis Center, Ohio Delaware County Library System
Indiana Limestone
7′-6″ x 4′-6″ x 12″
Lewis Center, Ohio
Delaware County Library System

I thank the Delaware County Library for their complete gift of artistic freedom. This piece was an unusual pleasure to create.

Indiana Limestone 7'-6" x 4'-6" x 12" Lewis Center, Ohio Delaware County Library System
Indiana Limestone
7′-6″ x 4′-6″ x 12″
Lewis Center, Ohio
Delaware County Library System

The kiss; the two sides unite.

Indiana Limestone 7'-6" x 4'-6" x 12" Lewis Center, Ohio Delaware County Library System
Indiana Limestone
7′-6″ x 4′-6″ x 12″
Lewis Center, Ohio
Delaware County Library System

The hammer blow… from thus, this. Magic. Reality. Here.

Indiana Limestone 7'-6" x 4'-6" x 12" Lewis Center, Ohio Delaware County Library System
Indiana Limestone
7′-6″ x 4′-6″ x 12″
Lewis Center, Ohio
Delaware County Library System

The exploring fish, unnerved… a marvel of the mysterious sea.

Indiana Limestone 7'-6" x 4'-6" x 12" Lewis Center, Ohio Delaware County Library System
Indiana Limestone
7′-6″ x 4′-6″ x 12″
Lewis Center, Ohio
Delaware County Library System

Forest spirits making sure the gold of legends is taken care of… and one of the Leprechauns has given up his duty for a higher cause.

Indiana Limestone 7'-6" x 4'-6" x 12" Lewis Center, Ohio Delaware County Library System
Indiana Limestone
7′-6″ x 4′-6″ x 12″
Lewis Center, Ohio
Delaware County Library System

The tunnel of myth… dare you?

 

Mythical Creatures

Mythical Creatures
Mythical Creatures
Indiana Limestone
8′-0″ x 5′-10″ x 12″

This piece was commissioned by my local library. I love libraries, and ours is a good one. I was given the theme, and the rest was left up to me. I spent the winter and early spring of 2012/2013 on this piece.

Mythical Creatures
Indiana Limestone
8′-0″ x 5′-10″ x 12″

This is the view as seen from the parking lot. It was landscaped last year, so the trees are young. I am sure that in a few years this will be a beautiful place to spend a summer afternoon reading.

Mythical Creatures Indiana Limestone 8'-0" x 5'-10" x 12"
Mythical Creatures
Indiana Limestone
8′-0″ x 5′-10″ x 12″

I drove the piece down this path with it strapped to my forklift.

Mythical Creatures Indiana Limestone 8'-0" x 5'-10" x 12"
Mythical Creatures
Indiana Limestone
8′-0″ x 5′-10″ x 12″

There is a story to the whole thing, of course. The story begins with Cyclops, the Greek God of the forge, and of Creativity, shatters the veil that separates this side from the other.

Mythical Creatures Indiana Limestone 8'-0" x 5'-10" x 12"
Mythical Creatures
Indiana Limestone
8′-0″ x 5′-10″ x 12″

The Leprechauns are guarding their gold as the forest watches over them, and a Mongolian Sand Worm rises up to try and break through. Cerberus will have none of that.

Mythical Creatures Indiana Limestone 8'-0" x 5'-10" x 12"
Mythical Creatures
Indiana Limestone
8′-0″ x 5′-10″ x 12″

If one comes out and looks at the view from the other side, this is what one finds. Here Cerberus allows an open passage, and King Arthur is pulling Excalibur from the stone. Ulysses sails beneath the Man in the Moon, and the Banshee howls.

Mythical Creatures Indiana Limestone 8'-0" x 5'-10" x 12"
Mythical Creatures
Indiana Limestone
8′-0″ x 5′-10″ x 12″

The border pattern was taken from an old Harvard Classics copy of Shakespeare that I had on my shelf, as were the proportions of the book. The entire piece is in the form of a book.

Mythical Creatures Indiana Limestone 8'-0" x 5'-10" x 12"
Mythical Creatures
Indiana Limestone
8′-0″ x 5′-10″ x 12″

Just a little sight seeing, officer, really… Strapped to the lift and ready for the delivery.

Mythical Creatures Indiana Limestone 8'-0" x 5'-10" x 12"
Mythical Creatures
Indiana Limestone
8′-0″ x 5′-10″ x 12″

All aboard! Man, that was a nerve wracking drive.

Mythical Creatures Indiana Limestone 8'-0" x 5'-10" x 12"
Mythical Creatures
Indiana Limestone
8′-0″ x 5′-10″ x 12″

The truck followed me in my smaller truck with the tools, etc., so I couldn’t see the piece in my rear view.  I hoped I had thought of everything that could go wrong and covered for it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Downtown Head

 

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

Angela Meleca Gallery in Columbus, Ohio, hosts Downtown Head and my paintings, including 8-12-2013 in the window.

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

Angela and Dale, after a successful installation. This piece is available. Shipment to anywhere, no problem.

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

The tradition of the colossal head is one that includes all eras and all cultures, and has always been a form of honor to the subject. This head is on a bearing, and can be turned by any passing citizen.

 

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

Making the great accessible is what it’s all about.

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

Fully looking in- or away- it depends on where you see it from, Downtown Head gets attention either way.

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

I’ve always liked this shot of the sculpture and its reflection. This is Downtown Columbus, within a couple blocks of the  Statehouse. Very site relevant.

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

Yes, driving big round things around requires a bit of preparation. I love the expressions of people as they pass me on the highway.

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

In the studio, ready for delivery.

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

Henry the St. Bernard is obviously impressed. Floored, really.

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head (work in progress)
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′
Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head (work in progress)
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

Rough out complete; the form begins to take shape.

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head (work in progress)
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

Rough out complete.

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head (work in progress)
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

It is critical to work at the right height. The back and shoulders and arms and hands and legs take a beating badly enough without complicating it by working too high or too low.

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head (work in progress)
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

I like to put a head in a block kitty corner. It helps to orient myself that way.

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head (work in progress)
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

At this stage I almost went for the Bishop’s Hat look, but that wasn’t what I was after. But it always helps to keep an open mind, right?

Downtown Head Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing 7'-6" x 3' x 3'
Downtown Head
Granite, Limestone, Steel, Bearing
7′-6″ x 3′ x 3′

In the beginning, there was the first chip. It takes a lot of chips to get ahead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mirror Lake Ice Cream Cone

Indiana LimestoneLocated on the Ohio State University Campus, Columbus, Ohio.
Indiana Limestone
Located on the Ohio State University Campus, Columbus, Ohio.

This 1500 pound carved  limestone ice cream cone stands proudly outside one of Ohio State University’s oldest buildings, which now houses the Mirror Lake Creamery and Grill on the ground floor. Thousands of students walk by my work every day on the campus. I wonder how many notice the top scoop is cherry? Carving the waffle cone texture was fun. Being a part of a place carved by generations of stone carvers is an honor.

First Responders Memorial

Cast Stainless Steel, Granite
Cast Stainless Steel, Granite

I was commissioned to create the focal sculpture for an Ohio park dedicated to our nation’s fallen First Responders. I created hundreds of different images of people doing very ordinary things; all of the poses are the sorts of things we all do every day, from walking the dog to playing a trumpet. I wanted to convey that any of us could have been targeted that day. Being asked to create a memorial sculpture for an event like 9/11 is beyond an honor; I felt an obligation to not only those that died that day, but to those of us living and doing our best not to forget. Working as a public sculptor is to be part of a memorial tradition as old as civilization.

Cast and Fabricated Stainless Steel, Granite
Cast and Fabricated Stainless Steel, Granite

Several of the first responders from New York’s Fire and Police departments came for the dedication.

Cast and Fabricated Stainless Steel, Granite
Cast and Fabricated Stainless Steel, Granite

The figures were each first drawn on paper, and then cut from sheet wax, which was then shaped and cast in stainless steel. Each stainless plate was then welded to the others to create a large steel “flame”.

Cast Stainless Steel, Granite
Cast Stainless Steel, Granite

Because the final sculpture has so many edges to catch the cover, a custom canvas cover was made to the right shape. After a few test runs the officer in charge of the unveiling figured out a technique, and the unveiling at the ceremony came off with no struggles.

Cast Stainless Steel, Granite
Cast Stainless Steel, Granite

The Honor Guard stood at attention for nearly an hour, amazingly motionlessly. They conveyed everything such an effort is expected to convey, and then some.

Cast Stainless Steel, Granite
Cast Stainless Steel, Granite

The architecture, lighting, granite, and fountain works were done by others, and they all did a fantastic job. Thanks guys!

 

Cast Stainless Steel, Granite
Cast Stainless Steel, Granite

These photos were all taken at the dedication by my daughter Amber, then fifteen.

Cast Stainless Steel, Granite
Cast Stainless Steel, Granite

If I remember, later I will crop this picture.

Cast Stainless Steel, Granite
Cast Stainless Steel, Granite

The piece at night casts amazing shadows on the entire area, and shimmers as the lights pass through the rippling water.

Cast Stainless Steel, Granite
Cast Stainless Steel, Granite

Thank you to everybody involved with this park!

Caroline Memorial

Kansas Limestone
Kansas Limestone

This sculpture was commissioned as a gift by my daughter’s graduating class of 2012, Wellington School. It is in memory of a schoolmate that died of brain cancer when the students were in kindergarten. Caroline was a playful girl, and loved the outdoors.

Kansas Limestone
Kansas Limestone

As a father, the honor was enormous. That class was full of great young people, and I am glad to have gotten to know them. I still see some of them around every now and then.

Kansas :Limestone
Kansas Limestone

Oh! I just realized I haven’t shot this in winter yet. Oh well- maybe next year. At least I hope we don’t have any more snow this spring. It’s been a cold winter.

 

Kansas Limestone
Kansas Limestone

The playground was funded, in part, by donations in her honor.